Book Report

Books by Alumni

The Two Lives and One Passion of
Louise Marshall:
Founder of the Cabbage Patch Settlement

Linda Raymond Ellison ’67 and Bill Ellison
Butler Books, August 2017

Rich, flawed, and female, Louise Marshall saved people from certain ruin and changed thousands of lives for the better. The Cabbage Patch Settlement of Louisville, Kentucky, still uses Marshall’s methods to attack today’s most difficult social problems.

Historical Animal Geographies

Sharon Wilcox ’01 and Stephanie Rutherford, editors
Routledge, May 2018

Historical animal geography explores how spatially situated human–animal relations have changed through time. It offers unique insight into the lives of animals past and how interrelationships were constructed among animals and humans.

 

Rescue Board: The Untold Story of America’s Efforts to Save the Jews of Europe

Rebecca Erbelding ’03
Doubleday, April 2018

America has long been criticized for refusing to harbor the Jews of Europe as Hitler and the Nazis closed in. Erbelding, a lauded Holocaust historian, tells the extraordinary story of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s effort late in the war to save the Jews who remained.

Rube Tube: CBS and Rural Comedy in the Sixties

Sara K. Eskridge ’03
University of Missouri Press, January 2019

Television’s rural comedy boom in the 1960s helped CBS revamp its public image after the 1940s Red Scare and the 1950s quiz show scandals. The Andy Griffith Show, The Beverly Hillbillies, Petticoat Junction, and other shows dominated ratings and attracted viewers from all parts of the country.

Soldiers in Revolt: Army Mutinies in Africa

Maggie Dwyer ’04
Hurst, October 2017
Oxford University Press, February 2018

Soldiers in Revolt examines military mutinies in Africa through interviews with former mutineers in Sierra Leone, Burkina Faso, and the Gambia. This view from the lower ranks is key to comprehending the internal struggles that can threaten a military’s ability to function effectively.

Debating Women: Gender, Education, and Spaces for Argument, 1835-1945

Carly S. Woods ’04
Michigan State University Press, October 2018

Excluded from public life, women of the United States and Great Britain formed debating organizations that taught them to speak eloquently, argue persuasively, and assert themselves as citizens. They questioned and redefined norms of gender, race, class, and nation.

 

The Titan Strain

Virginia M. Soenksen ’05
Milford House Press, May 2018

In this science fiction novel, dystopian London has become the playground of mods – humans illegally experimenting with genetic modification. It is also the home of Liane, an assassin trained by the shadowy government that rules the city. When mods turn up dead, Liane defies her orders to hunt for the killers.

Textiles of Japan

Virginia M. Soenksen ’05 and Thomas Murray
Prestel Verlag, March 2019

A discussion of the Japanese works collected by Thomas Murray, the book covers folk textiles, textiles of the indigenous Ainu, and textiles of the Okinawan Islands. Author Soenksen also wrote The Titan Strain, described above.

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